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23, Naturalist, Atheist-Luciferian, Wanna-Be Hermit.

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Ask me anything.

artemia:

note-a-bear:

aminaabramovic:

everyone needs to watch this video before they log off tonight

well, now I know what I’m doing every time a car alarm goes off

this looks like so much fun

(Source: merakiandmelaninblooms, via meganthefeminist)

5 minutes ago
426,122 notes

(Most of) Awesome Mix, Vol. 1

(Source: peterjquil, via upthe-wolves)

34 minutes ago
11,050 notes

zeekayart:

a guide for people who can’t tell the 90s from the early 2000s apart

  • if people are dressed in neon, it’s the 90simage
  • if people are dressed in space age metallics, it’s the 2000simage

(via katiedotcom)

3 hours ago
81,687 notes

It’s too early for me to be this irritated. Can’t do the deposit because I don’t have the right security level. Store manager is in Vermont, wont answer the phone or call me back. Can’t make necessary changes to time card sheet…not a high enough security level. So I have to wait until 2 for the other manager to come in and do it because the fucking computer wont let me. What’s the point of being a manager if I can’t do manage things?

20 minutes ago
0 notes

inkyblacknight:

i will never not reblog this post

(Source: ninadobrevs, via upthe-wolves)

1 hour ago
1,239,778 notes

adderlovesbatman:

death-will-be-me:

heyfunniest:

School of Rock appreciation post

was this movie even real omg

Yes it was and its the best thing ever

(Source: caughtinbetween10and20, via katiedotcom)

1 hour ago
280,577 notes

Anonymous said: I was talking with my boyfriend today about what I would do if I got pregnant accidentally. I stated very clearly I would get an abortion. He then said since he's partially responsible for a pregnancy, that he would pay for half. I totally have a great boyfriend. I was so happy I had to tell someone omg.

not-your-incubator:

pro-choice-or-no-voice:

I’m very happy for you! Sounds like you have a quite supportive abortion! ❤️

I also want to point out how important it is to communicate with your partners, like anon did! It’s always always always the pregnant person’s choice no matter what, but if you plan on becoming serious with someone, communicating about what you would do in that kind of situation is so important, you may realize you have a great support system, you may realize you don’t, and if that’s the case, you can come up with your own game plan if need be. Stay safe and strong loves. (: - Paige

He’s a keeper

image

2 hours ago
19 notes
we-are-star-stuff:

Virgin births: Do we need sex to reproduce?
Fatherless pregnancies happen in nature more than we thought, so what’s stopping human beings from doing the same?
It’s hard to be a woman. As if doing the reproductive heavy lifting wasn’t bad enough, nature played a cosmic prank in making women need men to complete the task, and giving them a limited window in which to have children.
Perhaps it would be simpler if women could go it alone. After all, not all animals are so hung up on sex. As New Scientist reported earlier this year, virgin births in nature are common. The females of several large and complex animals, such as lizards and sharks, can reproduce without males, a process called parthenogenesis – and now we’re realising it happens in the wild more often than we thought.
So could humans learn this biological trick, allowing women to fall pregnant on their own schedule – without men getting in the way?
It’s a given that, at the very least, women need sperm if they are to conceive. But there’s no reason why that source of sperm ought to be a man. Ten years ago, Japanese researchers unveiled a mouse that had two mothers but no father. Named Kaguya, after a mythical moon princess born in a bamboo stalk, she was created in a laboratory by combining genetic material from two female mice.
With a little bit of help, stem cells from a female donor can be induced to grow into sperm cells – something that would never normally occur. So it might be possible to create a child from two mothers, each of whom contributed half the genetic material. Of course, it’s not quite that simple, as Dr Allan Pacey, a reproductive biologist at the University of Sheffield, explains: “We can make something that looks like a sperm cell down a microscope, but whether it is programmed genetically in the same way is a really difficult thing to establish. I don’t know if there’s a way to check that except to use the sperm and see if the babies develop normally. You can do that in rats and mice but it’s a big step potentially to do that in a human.”
Even if researchers could clear that roadblock, a partner is still required. What if women didn’t need a second person?
In the wild, most females that resort to parthenogenesis do so only when it is strictly necessary – typically when they have become isolated from any males. Should several female komodo dragons wash up on a virgin island, they’ll be able produce males and kick start a brand new colony. Likewise, parthenogenesis in sharks came to light after several incidents in which lone females kept in aquariums inexplicably fell pregnant. But these are testing times for the animals. “Most large animals do not reproduce asexually, because evolutionarily it is not in their interest to do so,” says Pacey. They lose the genetic diversity that keeps a population healthy, he explains.
In theory, it might be possible to produce a child from one woman’s genetic material in the laboratory. The price they would pay, however, would be an alarming genetic bottleneck. When a gene pool is small, the risk of birth defects and other illnesses rises. Take the European royal families, nearly all of which are in some way related. Prognathism, a deformity that causes the lower jaw to jut out, is so common within the European royals that they lent the condition its common name, the Habsburg lip. Poor Prince Charles II of Spain suffered such an extended jaw that he could not even eat properly. In a normal population this condition would be diluted out, but in the tightly-knit European royals it emerged again and again.
Just as inbreeding reduces genetic diversity of a population, self-fertilisation can reduce the genetic diversity of your offspring. If you chose to reproduce entirely on your own, your child would only have one parent, and thus half the genetic diversity available to a normal child. Each subsequent generation of single-parent reproduction would continue that trend, with the increasing risk that normally hidden defects would surface. In this manner, your offspring would suffer a collapse in genetic diversity far worse than any European royal faced. “It’s not a good road to go down,” says Pacey. “You would only really want to do this for one generation or two.”
[Continue Reading →]

we-are-star-stuff:

Virgin births: Do we need sex to reproduce?

Fatherless pregnancies happen in nature more than we thought, so what’s stopping human beings from doing the same?

It’s hard to be a woman. As if doing the reproductive heavy lifting wasn’t bad enough, nature played a cosmic prank in making women need men to complete the task, and giving them a limited window in which to have children.

Perhaps it would be simpler if women could go it alone. After all, not all animals are so hung up on sex. As New Scientist reported earlier this year, virgin births in nature are common. The females of several large and complex animals, such as lizards and sharks, can reproduce without males, a process called parthenogenesis – and now we’re realising it happens in the wild more often than we thought.

So could humans learn this biological trick, allowing women to fall pregnant on their own schedule – without men getting in the way?

It’s a given that, at the very least, women need sperm if they are to conceive. But there’s no reason why that source of sperm ought to be a man. Ten years ago, Japanese researchers unveiled a mouse that had two mothers but no father. Named Kaguya, after a mythical moon princess born in a bamboo stalk, she was created in a laboratory by combining genetic material from two female mice.

With a little bit of help, stem cells from a female donor can be induced to grow into sperm cells – something that would never normally occur. So it might be possible to create a child from two mothers, each of whom contributed half the genetic material. Of course, it’s not quite that simple, as Dr Allan Pacey, a reproductive biologist at the University of Sheffield, explains: “We can make something that looks like a sperm cell down a microscope, but whether it is programmed genetically in the same way is a really difficult thing to establish. I don’t know if there’s a way to check that except to use the sperm and see if the babies develop normally. You can do that in rats and mice but it’s a big step potentially to do that in a human.”

Even if researchers could clear that roadblock, a partner is still required. What if women didn’t need a second person?

In the wild, most females that resort to parthenogenesis do so only when it is strictly necessary – typically when they have become isolated from any males. Should several female komodo dragons wash up on a virgin island, they’ll be able produce males and kick start a brand new colony. Likewise, parthenogenesis in sharks came to light after several incidents in which lone females kept in aquariums inexplicably fell pregnant. But these are testing times for the animals. “Most large animals do not reproduce asexually, because evolutionarily it is not in their interest to do so,” says Pacey. They lose the genetic diversity that keeps a population healthy, he explains.

In theory, it might be possible to produce a child from one woman’s genetic material in the laboratory. The price they would pay, however, would be an alarming genetic bottleneck. When a gene pool is small, the risk of birth defects and other illnesses rises. Take the European royal families, nearly all of which are in some way related. Prognathism, a deformity that causes the lower jaw to jut out, is so common within the European royals that they lent the condition its common name, the Habsburg lip. Poor Prince Charles II of Spain suffered such an extended jaw that he could not even eat properly. In a normal population this condition would be diluted out, but in the tightly-knit European royals it emerged again and again.

Just as inbreeding reduces genetic diversity of a population, self-fertilisation can reduce the genetic diversity of your offspring. If you chose to reproduce entirely on your own, your child would only have one parent, and thus half the genetic diversity available to a normal child. Each subsequent generation of single-parent reproduction would continue that trend, with the increasing risk that normally hidden defects would surface. In this manner, your offspring would suffer a collapse in genetic diversity far worse than any European royal faced. “It’s not a good road to go down,” says Pacey. “You would only really want to do this for one generation or two.”

[Continue Reading →]

3 hours ago
131 notes